THE : FUTURE : LABORATORY
00 : 00 : 00
UNLOCK CONTENT
scroll down
Comp-7-(0-01-14-05) 820px

‘Resilience isn’t just about toughening up,’ says
The Future Laboratory co-founder Martin Raymond. ‘It’s about relearning, rebooting and recalibrating brands, businesses, corporations and, more importantly, ourselves, as we push back against the age of SAFE – sanitised spaces, anonymous branding, faltering organisations and erratic responses to those big questions of our age.’

Welcome to the Resilience Movement – in which challenge, change, agility and innovation fight back.

Scroll down for an introduction to the three new macrotrends that will affect consumers and brands in the next 5–10 years.

Credits: 1. Still from Resilience Movement animation by Inferstudio for The Future Laboratory, 2. Desert X installation view, Western Flag (Spindletop, Texas), 2017-2019 by John Gerrard. Photography by Lance Gerber courtesy of Desert X.

Beyond Brexit, resilience is needed:
to make our brands more agile, living alone more empowering, and the ways we shape reality more complex, flexible and multi-faceted.

John Gerrard 5 Lance Gerber - 960px

Beyond Brexit, resilience is needed:
to make our brands more agile, living alone more empowering, and the ways we shape reality more complex, flexible and multi-faceted.

‘Resilience isn’t just about toughening up,’ says
The Future Laboratory co-founder Martin Raymond. ‘It’s about relearning, rebooting and recalibrating brands, businesses, corporations and, more importantly, ourselves, as we push back against the age of SAFE – sanitised spaces, anonymous branding, faltering organisations and erratic responses to those big questions of our age.’

Welcome to the Resilience Movement – in which challenge, change, agility and innovation fight back.

Scroll down for an introduction to the three new macrotrends that will affect consumers and brands in the next 5–10 years.

Credits: 1. Still from Resilience Movement animation by Inferstudio for The Future Laboratory, 2. Desert X installation view, Western Flag (Spindletop, Texas), 2017-2019 by John Gerrard. Photography by Lance Gerber courtesy of Desert X.

Resilience Culture

RC 1

We have been living in an age of self-censorship, hyper-safe spaces and social comfort zones. But as global anxieties abound, a countermovement of resilience is breaking through.

Front cover of Aesthetica magazine, February / March issue. Photography by Matias Alonso Revelli

Hindsight

We have been living in a state of self-censorship, hyper-safe spaces and comfort-zone culture, nestling among the people, platforms, places and behaviours that make us feel like one of the crowd.

But this bubble-wrapped existence hasn’t worked. Self-care has turned into a social media performance, our responsibilities are outsourced to technology, and young people avoid social situations in favour of the safety of home. Yet anxiety and personal dissatisfaction remain prevalent – and people are pushing to make urgent change.

Insight

From education and media platforms to health and wellbeing practices, brands are challenging consumers to explore physical and mental extremes. The reason? To ensure more resilient, purpose-driven futures.

Through the growth of Resilience Culture, we’ll examine stress and failure as positive forces, meet the women embarking on punishing pursuits, and reveal the emerging media platforms helping citizens to embrace and champion alternative points of view. Among these need-to-know trends, we’ll explore:

Teaching Tenacity

Explore how alternative viewpoints and challenging calls to action are letting young people to better navigate the world around them.

Positive Discomfort

With an eye on wellbeing, emerging initiatives are reframing stress as a positive influence, rather than one to be avoided completely.

Extreme Fitness

Discover the new fitness programmes that focus on visceral resilience and extreme activities – and challenge whether it’s healthy to chase comfort.

Perversity Media

As social media propels fake news and populist mindsets, discover the next-generation media platforms confronting our beliefs and bursting our filter bubbles.

Fortitude in Failure

Meet the people and brands demonstrating resilience by transforming failure into a positive force for future success.

Disengaging Devices

As citizens reassess the pervasiveness of technology in their lives, new devices and platforms are encouraging us to re-engage with responsibilities and self-reliance.

Foresight

Armed with their new-found resilience, tomorrow’s consumers will explore how access, privacy and their own brain can be positively tested to enhance and continually improve their resolve.

Looking ahead, brands will re-instil friction to make their products even more desirable, while mind-moulding solutions will become a luxury service, helping our brains to respond positively to future emotional challenges. By 2030, collective resilience will become a virtue that symbolises the world’s most successful, agile societies.

Become a member of LS:N Global to get access to the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. Disposable Kintsugi. Photo by Mathery Studio, 2. Front cover of Aesthetica magazine, February / March issue. Photography by Matias Alonso Revelli, 3. NR magazine editorial by Gemma Bedini, 4. The Extraordinary Adventure Club, London
RC 1
3-405
4-56743

We have been living in an age of self-censorship, hyper-safe spaces and social comfort zones. But as global anxieties abound, a countermovement of resilience is breaking through.

Hindsight

We have been living in a state of self-censorship, hyper-safe spaces and comfort-zone culture, nestling among the people, platforms, places and behaviours that make us feel like one of the crowd.

But this bubble-wrapped existence hasn’t worked. Self-care has turned into a social media performance, our responsibilities are outsourced to technology, and young people avoid social situations in favour of the safety of home. Yet anxiety and personal dissatisfaction remain prevalent – and people are pushing to make urgent change.

Insight

From education and media platforms to health and wellbeing practices, brands are challenging consumers to explore physical and mental extremes. The reason? To ensure more resilient, purpose-driven futures.

Through the growth of Resilience Culture, we’ll examine stress and failure as positive forces, meet the women embarking on punishing pursuits, and reveal the emerging media platforms helping citizens to embrace and champion alternative points of view. Among these need-to-know trends, we’ll explore:

Teaching Tenacity

Explore how alternative viewpoints and challenging calls to action are letting young people to better navigate the world around them.

Positive Discomfort

With an eye on wellbeing, emerging initiatives are reframing stress as a positive influence, rather than one to be avoided completely.

Extreme Fitness

Discover the new fitness programmes that focus on visceral resilience and extreme activities – and challenge whether it’s healthy to chase comfort.

Perversity Media

As social media propels fake news and populist mindsets, discover the next-generation media platforms confronting our beliefs and bursting our filter bubbles.

Fortitude in Failure

Meet the people and brands demonstrating resilience by transforming failure into a positive force for future success.

Disengaging Devices

As citizens reassess the pervasiveness of technology in their lives, new devices and platforms are encouraging us to re-engage with responsibilities and self-reliance.

Foresight

Armed with their new-found resilience, tomorrow’s consumers will explore how access, privacy and their own brain can be positively tested to enhance and continually improve their resolve.

Looking ahead, brands will re-instil friction to make their products even more desirable, while mind-moulding solutions will become a luxury service, helping our brains to respond positively to future emotional challenges. By 2030, collective resilience will become a virtue that symbolises the world’s most successful, agile societies.

Become a member of LS:N Global to get access to the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. Disposable Kintsugi. Photo by Mathery Studio, 2. Front cover of Aesthetica magazine, February / March issue. Photography by Matias Alonso Revelli, 3. NR magazine editorial by Gemma Bedini, 4. The Extraordinary Adventure Club, London
Unlock Content

Complete the form

Uncoupled Living

klarna-9
1- Culture Calendar, Klarna by Snask Studio
3-
2-1

Being in a couple is becoming a less prevalent way to structure society, as more adults embrace the single life.

4-

Hindsight

For centuries, society has been structured around the concept of the ‘married couple’ or coupling, with single people discriminated against, stigmatised and stereotyped.

But with marriage rates in decline and more people living alone, eating alone, and purchasing for one, being single is no longer considered an anomaly. In fact, it’s become liberating, with positive singledom driving not only a shift in perception but greater diversity of relationships in the modern era.

Insight

As the ways in which we think about our relationships and life commitments change, so too must the products and services we use. Brands are beginning to think of single people as a whole new market of consumers who approach life very differently.

This is evident in categories such as travel, housing and entertainment, in which brands are reframing everything from how they market products to how they define leisure as a single-person pursuit.

Self-purchasing Economy

In categories where the target audience tended to be the opposite sex, brands are now pivoting their marketing to appeal to single men and women who they may have previously ignored.

Single-serve Leisure

As we spend more time alone, we are rethinking what constitutes leisure, from brands creating offerings intended for solo enjoyment to reducing the stigma of ‘me time’.

Alone/Together Travel

There was a 143% increase in searches around solo travel between 2015 and 2018, suggesting a new opportunity has opened up for hospitality brands to become more singles-friendly.

Modern Cohabitation

The expense of living alone means developers are rethinking housing, in a way that balances privacy with sharing the financial responsibility of running a household.

Self-health

Brands are beginning to see how health and wellness products can be marketed towards a group that has no one else looking after them.

Single Parents Empowered

Just as societal views have shifted on children out of wedlock, coupledom will become disentangled from childbearing, as more people elect to be single parents.

Foresight

In the decade ahead, the uncoupling of society will mean that ‘the individual’ is in the frame more than ever. Global acceptance of singledom will make it a positive lifestyle choice, shaping new behaviours – and products – for the workplace and the home.

It will also inevitably impact those who are in couples as well. As more people embrace individualistic coupledom, brands must ensure they not only cater to different emotional needs, but also help people to enrich their many emotionships – rather than focusing on that one ultimate relationship.

Become a member of LS:N Global to get access to the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. Culture Calendar, Klarna by Snask Studio, 2. Single is a Terrible Thing to Waste by Wieden + Kennedy for Tinder. Photography by Ryan McGinley, 3. Singular Residence Hotel, branding by Futura, photography by Rodrigo Chapa, 4. Naive for Supernaive by CMTV, Shot by Antoine Bal

Being in a couple is becoming a less prevalent way to structure society, as more adults embrace the single life.

Hindsight

For centuries, society has been structured around the concept of the ‘married couple’ or coupling, with single people discriminated against, stigmatised and stereotyped.

But with marriage rates in decline and more people living alone, eating alone, and purchasing for one, being single is no longer considered an anomaly. In fact, it’s become liberating, with positive singledom driving not only a shift in perception but greater diversity of relationships in the modern era.

Insight

As the ways in which we think about our relationships and life commitments change, so too must the products and services we use. Brands are beginning to think of single people as a whole new market of consumers who approach life very differently.

This is evident in categories such as travel, housing and entertainment, in which brands are reframing everything from how they market products to how they define leisure as a single-person pursuit.

Self-purchasing Economy

In categories where the target audience tended to be the opposite sex, brands are now pivoting their marketing to appeal to single men and women who they may have previously ignored.

Single-serve Leisure

As we spend more time alone, we are rethinking what constitutes leisure, from brands creating offerings intended for solo enjoyment to reducing the stigma of ‘me time’.

Alone/Together Travel

There was a 143% increase in searches around solo travel between 2015 and 2018, suggesting a new opportunity has opened up for hospitality brands to become more singles-friendly.

Modern Cohabitation

The expense of living alone means developers are rethinking housing, in a way that balances privacy with sharing the financial responsibility of running a household.

Self-health

Brands are beginning to see how health and wellness products can be marketed towards a group that has no one else looking after them.

Single Parents Empowered

Just as societal views have shifted on children out of wedlock, coupledom will become disentangled from childbearing, as more people elect to be single parents.

Foresight

In the decade ahead, the uncoupling of society will mean that ‘the individual’ is in the frame more than ever. Global acceptance of singledom will make it a positive lifestyle choice, shaping new behaviours – and products – for the workplace and the home.

It will also inevitably impact those who are in couples as well. As more people embrace individualistic coupledom, brands must ensure they not only cater to different emotional needs, but also help people to enrich their many emotionships – rather than focusing on that one ultimate relationship.

Become a member of LS:N Global to get access to the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. Culture Calendar, Klarna by Snask Studio, 2. Single is a Terrible Thing to Waste by Wieden + Kennedy for Tinder. Photography by Ryan McGinley, 3. Singular Residence Hotel, branding by Futura, photography by Rodrigo Chapa, 4. Naive for Supernaive by CMTV, Shot by Antoine Bal

Programmable Realities

FRKWYS Vol. 15- serenitatem by Visible Cloaks, Yoshio Ojima & Satsuki Shibano

The rise of reactive new materials and technologies means that future physical consumer touchpoints will no longer be set in stone… or any other solid matter.

PR 4- Microsoft rebranding by Microsoft and Tendril copy

Hindsight

The cognitive separation between the real and virtual realms is becoming far less pronounced. Advances in mixed-reality technologies combined with the power of machine learning are extending our experience of reality in a much more meaningful way. At the same time, reactive new materials and technologies are allowing real objects to replicate with ease the ever-changing nature of the digital sphere.

More than half of the world’s population is now online and access to cheap, hi-res sensors is growing rapidly. This digital layer is becoming so seamlessly integrated into our lives that soon everything in our physical world will have a digital twin. As our experiences of the digital and physical worlds become inextricably linked, we are in need of an entirely new language that can convey this era of fluid interaction, which will radically change our relationship to the products we consume – and to each other.

Insight

Consumers are accustomed to the highly customised and responsive nature of digital, so there is a growing expectation that the real and virtual realms will instantly adapt to them in an equally personalised manner.

Brands across sectors such as beauty, fashion, entertainment, retail, and health and wellness are demonstrating the value of fluid consumer touchpoints that evolve and grow alongside this new breed of data-driven consumer who is constantly in flux.

Digitisation Economy

As mixed-reality commerce gathers pace, a growing community of start-ups and creative digital studios is facilitating the transition between physical and digital by offering digitisation as a service.

Fluid Identities

The mutable and reactive nature of digital design is allowing for a new variety of fashion and beauty products that push the boundaries of creativity without committing to substantial manufacturing costs.

Real-time Products

As more and more consumers become immersed in the worlds of health and wellness, they are looking for products that can constantly adapt to optimise their experience and retain relevance across various environments and pursuits.

Evolving Communications

A new generation of designers is challenging existing narratives and power structures in communications, allowing brands to interact with their consumers much more organically and convey an ever-evolving message in real time.

Elastic Content

Whereas once the content we consumed followed a fixed course, the rise of new technologies is creating new possibilities for unique content that responds to real-world environments.

Foresight

In the future, brands will become integrated into every element of consumer life, and consumers – facilitated by brands – will create their own versions of reality. Smart material innovation will create environments that can be transformed at the swipe of a finger, from the interior of autonomous vehicles to the next generation of hotel rooms.

And as our world becomes entirely programmable, the escalating demand for hyper-personalisation will require an entirely new approach to coding, one that relies on intuition rather than expertise, to allow consumers complete control over their own realities.

Become a member of LS:N Global to discover the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. FRKWYS Vol. 15: Serenitatem by Visible Cloaks, 2. Asung Ko by Ines Alpha, 3. Nike Adapt BB Shoe, 4. Microsoft rebranding by Microsoft and Tendril
FRKWYS Vol. 15- serenitatem by Visible Cloaks, Yoshio Ojima & Satsuki Shibano
PR 2- Asung Ko by Ines Alpha
PR 3- Nike BB Adapt

The rise of reactive new materials and technologies means that future physical consumer touchpoints will no longer be set in stone… or any other solid matter.

Hindsight

The cognitive separation between the real and virtual realms is becoming far less pronounced. Advances in mixed-reality technologies combined with the power of machine learning are extending our experience of reality in a much more meaningful way. At the same time, reactive new materials and technologies are allowing real objects to replicate with ease the ever-changing nature of the digital sphere.

More than half of the world’s population is now online and access to cheap, hi-res sensors is growing rapidly. This digital layer is becoming so seamlessly integrated into our lives that soon everything in our physical world will have a digital twin. As our experiences of the digital and physical worlds become inextricably linked, we are in need of an entirely new language that can convey this era of fluid interaction, which will radically change our relationship to the products we consume – and to each other.

Insight

Consumers are accustomed to the highly customised and responsive nature of digital, so there is a growing expectation that the real and virtual realms will instantly adapt to them in an equally personalised manner.

Brands across sectors such as beauty, fashion, entertainment, retail, and health and wellness are demonstrating the value of fluid consumer touchpoints that evolve and grow alongside this new breed of data-driven consumer who is constantly in flux.

Digitisation Economy

As mixed-reality commerce gathers pace, a growing community of start-ups and creative digital studios is facilitating the transition between physical and digital by offering digitisation as a service.

Fluid Identities

The mutable and reactive nature of digital design is allowing for a new variety of fashion and beauty products that push the boundaries of creativity without committing to substantial manufacturing costs.

Real-time Products

As more and more consumers become immersed in the worlds of health and wellness, they are looking for products that can constantly adapt to optimise their experience and retain relevance across various environments and pursuits.

Evolving Communications

A new generation of designers is challenging existing narratives and power structures in communications, allowing brands to interact with their consumers much more organically and convey an ever-evolving message in real time.

Elastic Content

Whereas once the content we consumed followed a fixed course, the rise of new technologies is creating new possibilities for unique content that responds to real-world environments.

Foresight

In the future, brands will become integrated into every element of consumer life, and consumers – facilitated by brands – will create their own versions of reality. Smart material innovation will create environments that can be transformed at the swipe of a finger, from the interior of autonomous vehicles to the next generation of hotel rooms.

And as our world becomes entirely programmable, the escalating demand for hyper-personalisation will require an entirely new approach to coding, one that relies on intuition rather than expertise, to allow consumers complete control over their own realities.

Become a member of LS:N Global to discover the full macrotrend.

Credits: 1. FRKWYS Vol. 15: Serenitatem by Visible Cloaks, 2. Asung Ko by Ines Alpha, 3. Nike Adapt BB Shoe, 4. Microsoft rebranding by Microsoft and Tendril

Macrotrends In-house Presentations

Book one of our experts to present our macrotrends at your own event or business

Close

Get in touch to learn more about The Future Laboratory’s products and services

How can we help?
Close
Welcome to The Resilience Movement webinar

You are about to discover our 2019 macrotrends – Resilience Culture, Programmable Realities and
Uncoupled Living


WATCH WEBINAR