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The Future Laboratory has been identifying 
and tracking macrotrends for two decades.

As The Transformative Twenties begin, we have 
mapped out how all these trends have evolved.

Use our bespoke Trend Tracker to learn how 
Experiences, Brands and Consumer behaviours 
have changed – and what this means for the future

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We have become more optimised and connected. As human behaviours evolve, what do these complex mindset shifts mean for the future of consumption?
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Discover how brands have morphed from basic providers into collaborative civic confidants. As we move post-purpose, how will they adapt?
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Explore how the experience economy has shifted from the transactional to the physical. With new tools changing our realities, what will enlighten us next?
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ACCESS MACROTRENDS
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Brand Image-1
Over the past two decades, brands have
developed a lifestyle of aspiration and
effortless status that we could buy into.

Now as they become more like comrades
than corporate entities, explore how and
why their outlook has changed, and what
this means for the future of your business.

While scrolling through, click on any
macrotrend to read the full report on our
trends intelligence platform, LS:N Global.
Potato Head x Max Lamb
The Museum of Copying by FAT
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT FEAR, UNCERTAINTY, DOUBT Marriage, the middle class,
middle management, middle age,
Christianity, teenagers, elderly men
and housewives are just a few of
the old economy groupings and
tribes in social free-fall. Childhood
is being eroded and many of us,
wary of the future, have begun
to revisit and reconstruct our
own pasts.
ON THE BRANDWAGON
Male gender roles are in turmoil, but so too
are the contents of men’s magazines and the
lifestyle categories on which they were once
founded. New Men have been dethroned by
New Lads, then Soft Lads and these, in turn,
by a slew of lifestyle categories that have
attempted to pin men down at a time when
they are defying all attempts to label them.
NO-BROW CULTURE
The advertising world has realised that a decade or more of relentless youth marketing, where young people have been exposed to a barrage of emotional activity from fashion stores to fast food joints, has left them numbed by the experience.
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
Until recently Corporate Social
Responsibility (CSR) was a slow-
burn issue discussed by many
companies but pioneered by few.
CSR has become high priority in
boardrooms cross the US and
Europe, with the ethical role of
employers under closer scrutiny
now than ever before. 
10% of the workforce state that
CSR would affect their choice
of employer
The Work Foundation and
The Future Foundation
‘Companies would stand a much
greater chance of recruiting first-
choice applicants if they paid
attention to environmental and
community concerns’
The Work Foundation and The Future Foundation
BRAND CHILDREN
Forget jigsaws and building
blocks. Today’s kids don’t
play with toys. They are too busy
TV and DVDs, texting, computer
websites. This has made them
generation there has ever been.
EUROTEENS
Teens of Europe are starting
to show a surprising maturity
of opinion and outlook. This is
a generation prepared to get
to grips with politics, national
identity, family, relationships
and friendships. The first
generation of the new
millennium are optimistic,
relaxed, laid-back and
pragmatic at the same time.
Geist.xyz by Zeitguised
SPECTACLES
OF THE SENSES
Branded environments are still integral to
the mindscapes and outlook of teens,
even though slogans and straplines have
ceased to be direct missives. Brand palaces
and vast immersive stores are created and
act as beacons and showcases for their
brand ideology.
BRAND BASICS
Consumers want to forge relationships with
brands that are personal, intimate and one-
to-one. They demand more than a relationship
with the brands we vote for and support.
They demand immersion, imagination and
a hither to unrealised level of interaction,
attentiveness and attention to detail.
FMGFs
FMGFs (Fast-Moving Gourmet
Foods) are poised to
revolutionise the takeaway
and fast food market as the
backlash against globesity
grows. FMGF services are being
driven by the increasing
sophistication of the average
consumer and the resulting
emergence of the ultra-
connoisseurs.
NU MORALITIES
Now services, brands,
products and even pastimes
are increasingly being judged
by the consumer on moral
rather than political grounds.
Consumers are reaching their
own conclusions about good
and bad behaviour.
Treehotel
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT THE FIFTH SCENARIO Our economic, political and
environmental systems are
collapsing. Biological and business
systems are mutating. New life
forms are emerging. ‘There are
few people who think the amount
of disruption we are going through
now is going to decrease over time
– most people think it’s going to
increase,’ says Salim Ismail,
executive director of Singularity
University.
BRANDTOCRACIES
As we move into the 10s, the widespread
proliferation of social media networks
means that consumers increasingly
expect brand relationships to be based
on conversation. Welcome to the age
of Brandtocracy, where brands must
be more democratic and human to gain
consumer appeal.
80%
of consumers want
companies to show
a more human face
Euro RSCG Worldwide
The Age of Re-engagement by The Future Laboratory
‘It’s never been easier
relationship with your
can no longer assume
an apolitical voice’
Neil Perkin, IPC Media
IMPRESSION MANAGEMENT
As the internet enables brands and individuals
to be more visible than ever before, the face
we present to the world becomes increasingly
important. Our virtual appearance is now
nipped, tucked and airbrushed as we attempt
to perfect our personal brands for a virtual
audience of peers, employers and consumers.
EMBEDDED MARKETING
As consumers have more opportunity to avoid
advertising, brands are reinventing product
placement, enriching media content by
embedding their brands rather than simply
placing their products in any given context.
ALPHALUX
In the wake of an economic downturn, the
luxury industry has experienced a shock from
falling sales and consumer confidence. Now,
it must evolve from an over-reliance on brand
names alone to a model that places heritage,
austerity, brand quietness and a localised
sense of self at the forefront of its cultural DNA.
Deathbed campaign by Chi and Partners
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT PROHIBITION CULTURE Everywhere you look, behaviour is
being curbed, controlled, nudged
and monitored. The ‘war on waste’
is creating a stealth tax that covers
everything from the food we eat
to how we should live, look and
engage with the brands we buy.
LEANOMICS
On the back of the recession, climate
change and a growing desire among
consumers to seek fewer but better
products, brands must increasingly
offer values alongside value. There
will be a growth of thick value
brands, businesses and design
models. Lean becomes the new
buzzword and the new philosophy.
‘We’re over-saturated
with stuff and the
messages that sell
us more stuff’
Simon Aboud, Make Believe agency
Installation by COS and Snarkitecture
Our leisure time has diminished:
20% of the working UK population
now works at least a 48-hour week
2009 British Social Attitudes report
Owned by No One by Robin Alysha Clemens
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT TURBULENT TEENS Entire brand, product and service
philosophies will have to be
recalibrated to appeal to a
consumer for whom considered
consumption, sustainability status
and stuffocation aren’t just buzz
terms. Less is increasingly more.
Brands will have to show how
essential their offer is.
FUTURE MEDIA LANDSCAPES
In this brave new world of fragmented media,
people are always on, multitasking at
multiscreens, sharing, creating and debating.
As their transmedia experiences evolve,
context – not content – will be king.
Emotional Supply Chains by Korakrit Arunanondchai
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT ANARCONOMY DECADE Something is stirring. In Egypt,
a people’s revolt has overthrown
a long-standing oppressor.
In the UK, students smashed through
government buildings in anger over
rising tuition fees. This rebellious
spirit is causing change, driving
people to reject compromise
and focus instead on bold
transformation.
FACTION MARKETING
Spoiled by the know-everything, see-everything culture of the web, consumers are once more suspending their disbelief and seizing on a new wave of narrative brandscapes, back stories and fairy tales, which, by blurring the real with the fake, take on a life of their own.
TRANSMEDIA FUTURES
New platforms are replacing linear media
– these shifts are creating a networked system
where the consumer, rather than the publisher
or broadcaster, is in control.
SYMBIOTIC BRANDING
Collaboration used to be optional
for brands that want to create
buzz or a one-off product range.
Now it is a rule not the exception,
as brand-jackers, space-squatters
and brandalists fast become the
new branding norms.
‘The relationship between
consumer and brand has
changed, from one of
prescription to one of
collaboration, and now
to one of symbiosis’
Steve Vranakis, Google Creative Lab
Care by Volvo campaign by Forsman & Bodenfors, Sweden
‘Collaboration is occurring on
a much deeper level than token
associations. It’s an opportunity
for companies to enter longer-
lasting, symbiotic relationships
with other parties’
Lauren Anderson, think tank Collaborative Lab
Anthony McCall You and I
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT
RE-ENLIGHTENMENT
RISING
For years people looked down on it as dull, square and best kept behind closed doors, but science is now breaking out of the laboratory – onto theatre stages and fashion catwalks, into galleries and shops, and into the minds of the brightest creatives.
THE DAWN OF MEGA SYSTEMS
Apple, Amazon, Alibaba, Google, Facebook
and Weibo are no longer simply trading
platforms. They are the mega-systems
of tomorrow, within which most of us
will socialise, shop and live our lives.
Collection 4 by Phelan
FUTURETAINMENT
As audiences flock to immersive, convivial
experiences, entertainers are blurring
the distinctions between spectator and
performer, digital and physical, hospitality
and art, and reality and fantasy.
THE CONVERGENCE ECONOMY
The borders between lifestyle
industries, between forms of art
and entertainment, and between the
senses are increasingly blurred.
Brands can be anything and walls
are for tearing down.
Kuri campaign by Mayfield Robotics
BY 2030 the average home
in China will have
40–50 intelligent
devices or sensors
connected to the
internet, generating
200 terabytes
of data on an
annual basis
2013 report from International
Data Corporation
‘The more virtual the world
gets, the more people crave
human-on-human contact’
Jennifer Rubell, artist
Makin moves by Kouhei Namaka
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT NEW BRICOLAGE LIVING Identity used to be something that
you were born with. Age, race,
gender and nationality were firmly
fixed and determined your place
in the world. Now, our identities are
sliding further towards something
we collect, assemble and arrange.
We are entering an era of Bricolage Living.
ANTI-AUTHENTICITY MARKETING
Tales of authenticity and heritage are leaving
a bad taste in consumers’ mouths as brands
mercilessly misappropriate these values and
divest them of meaning.
THE IMMORTAL BRAND
In a world buffeted by political
instability, it is impossible to ignore
the damage done by short-term
thinking. In the face of this endemic
short-sightedness, consumers and
business leaders are rejecting
ephemerality and immediate
gratification, and seeking grand
challenges and epic projects.
Frustration with
short-termism is
fuelling a desire for
long-term thinking,
and consumers are
looking for brands
that think ahead
The Turning Point advertisement
‘Designing a product that
lasts for generations at peak
performance and that requires
no maintenance, service or
replacement… must be
the long-term goal’
Jake Dyson, designer
REVELATIONS BRANDS
The digital revolution promised to save us time,
but instead we are busier than ever. It promised
to broaden our horizons, but left us trapped in
a prison of our own prejudices. Consumers
now want to bring discovery, serendipity and
revelation back into their lives.
Space 10 lab by Ikea
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT THE LEARNING ECONOMY Education has changed from an
early-life to a life-long activity,
but traditional institutions have
failed to keep up with consumers.
Brands are now stepping in
as partners in this continuing
process of self-improvement.
BACKLASH BRANDS
In an age of constant consumer
backlash, bold brands are choosing
to stand their ground rather than
bow to every customer whim,
staging a reaction of their own.
‘If you’re not pissing off
50% of people, you’re

not trying hard enough’
Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia
We live in a paradoxical time.
In 2016, political correctness
dominates the airwaves,
while at the same time
the US presidential election
is dominated by a man who
espouses bigotry and racism.
Commence Operation Boomerang advertisement
CIVIC BRANDS
Businesses are increasingly stepping in
where governments are failing and acting
as forces for good in society. Amid the shift
from top-down corporate hegemony to post-
ownership models, brands will need to act
as educators and enablers, providing tools
for a decentralised economy.
BRAND CULTURE 2020
Responding to an increasingly unstable
marketplace, tomorrow’s brands will seek to
combine the benefits of automation with the
creation of a workforce that is truly diverse.
Workbays Village by ECAL and Vitra
THE FOCUS FILTER
Economic scarcity over the past 200 years has
shifted from land to labour to knowledge, and
now thanks to the internet, attention. But in the
years ahead, focus will replace attention as the
goal for all communications. Attention is fleeting
while focus is prolonged, a distinction that
today’s brands seem to be missing.
STOREFONT SALVATION
Fuelled by an understanding that saving
the store relies on a combination of physical
touchpoints and digital technology, retailers
are reconsidering the purpose of bricks-and-
mortar shops.
Photography by Matias Alonso Revelli
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT RESILIENCE CULTURE We live in an age of comfort zone
culture, nestling among the people,
platforms, places and behaviours
where we feel like one of the
crowd. But this bubble-wrapped
existence isn’t working. To help
consumers break out of their
cocoons, counter-movements are materialising, powered by brands
and institutions.
COMMUNITY COMMERCE
A new wave of decentralised
retail concepts are transforming
e-commerce as consumers look
for alternative ways to access
and exchange products and
services online.
‘E-commerce is only tapping into the logical part of our brains. We are missing out on the other social and emotional factors which people are really looking for in order to connect with a brand’
Dr Dimitrios Tsivrikos, University College London
‘The current digital business
model is extremely lucrative
for tech giants, but is far less
advantageous for the majority
of local companies, organisations
and individuals’
UNStudio
POST-PURPOSE BRANDS
Recognising that purpose or
sustainability are not the sole
reasons for their existence, brands
will fuel their infrastructures with
data streams to continually redefine
their offering as relevant to
consumers while undertaking their
own journey of constant betterment.
HINDSIGHT
Using purpose as a way to add value has
become morally and socially questionable.
A new generation of digital natives will use
data and technology to fuel betterment.
INSIGHT
Virtuous consumers expect brands to make
sacrifices too. Fuelled by data, they can act
as consumer companions on the journey
towards betterment.
FORESIGHT
As smart infrastructures become a reality,
the role of brands will be as investors in
data-driven innovation cycles.
FEDERATED FUTURES
Brand Britain is in freefall, the union
fragmenting, the divide between north
and south never more extreme. But
with disruption comes unprecedented
opportunity – the rise of super-regional
cities, cybertech vales, biotech hills
and AI corridors. In-shoring will allow
us to re-assess our climate footprint
and drive micro-manufacturing,
while post-Covid-19 lessons will
revolutionise how we work from home,
define corporations and do business.
HINDSIGHT
Social media, the rise of populism, Brexit, gender and wage inequalities, Covid-19 and the ongoing climate crisis – all have contributed to this new normal paradigm. But our increased desire to live in a more federated country, work in more federated business structures and develop more federated ways of living are all having an impact on what it means to be British today.
INSIGHT
At face value, this new map
looks insular, nationalistic and
self-serving, but when you
review the early adopter
evidence of such change, it is
clear we are becoming more
global, untethered and agile:
a science-based technocracy
that places ideas, creativity
and innovation at its core.
FORESIGHT
This mass-market remote working (MMRW) shift will lead to new household configurations as people covet 5G work suites and hyperlocal co-working communities. Physical presenteeism will no longer be valid as a key measure of productivity.

To find out how you can prepare for 2030
ACCESS MACROTRENDS
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2001
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2004
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2020
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2031
Experience Image-1-1
Experiences have slowly superseded
objects in the minds of consumers, marking
a shift from materialism to experientialism.
As consumers tire of ever-more prosaic
and empty experiences, they are now
looking inwards for greater meaning.

Explore how the experience-led trends of
the past 20 years have evolved and played
a pivotal role in creating the tools and
behaviours that will define our future.

While scrolling through, click on any
macrotrend to read the full report on our
trends intelligence platform, LS:N Global.
Billie Eilish for Calvin Klein
The Museum of Copying by FAT
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT FEAR, UNCERTAINTY, DOUBT Marriage, the middle class,
middle management, middle age,
Christianity, teenagers, elderly men
and housewives are just a few of
the old economy groupings and
tribes in social free-fall. Childhood
is being eroded and many of us,
wary of the future, have begun
to revisit and reconstruct our
own pasts.
SPECTACLE
OF THE SENSES
Branded environments are still integral to the
mindscapes and outlook of Sunshine Teens,
even though slogans and straplines have
ceased to be direct missives. Brand palaces,
vast immersive stores, are created and act
as beacons and showcases for their
brand ideology.
Geist.xyz by Zeitguised
CONSUMER NETOCRACIES
New technology does not transform society. Society transforms itself, using new technology. Typical internet users hook up to broadband networks because they are task-orientated, not for the meaningless ‘bytes per second’ they are sold.
5D BRANDING
Marketing used to focus
narrowly on the visual. But
in a world where touch, smell,
sound and taste are also
entering the marketing arena,
modern brands will have to
appeal to all five senses
in order to compete.
RETAIL FUTURES
Offline markets are now fighting
back with experience-driven offers,
niche and tactile retail formats,
neighbourhood-specific offers and
micro-versions of larger formats.
There is increased emphasis on
service, premium convenience and
24-hour home delivery.
LEISURE HIVE
The advent of high-speed home broadband has turned couch potatoes into micropreneurs. Working and playing online now means that formerly passive mediums like TVs, CDs and DVDs are increasingly interactive, collaborative and profitable. We are witnessing a shift from a passive leisure model to one that is experiential, active and immersive.
CULTURAL REBOOTING
The dominance of celebrity culture is coming
to an end. In this new era, meaning is the
new money. The art world is booming, art
fairs and museums are packed out, the home
is now a gallery and institutes of learning have
become destinations for experience. In this
conceptual age, art is the new fashion and
its creators our icons.
IMMERSIVE LIVING
The line between the online and offline worlds is blurring. Information is being embedded in our everyday environment in the form of Bluetooth and RFID chips. Immersive Living marks a shift from fixed-location access to constant access.
BY 2008 there will be more
than 160m wifi-
enabled devices in
western Europe, a
figure representing
one-third of western
European mobile
consumers
The Cloud
‘Millennials are motivated by a
desire to be a live node on the
network… To be busy, to be
connected, is to be alive, to be
recognised and to matter’

Linda Stone
BEYOND THE SHOPFRONT
Stores are increasingly focusing
on becoming destination venues.
Consumers are growing
accustomed to being constantly
networked and informed, and
they expect retail to be there
alongside them. Retailers must
go beyond their shopfront or
online presence to create a
360-degree shopping experience.
Pause For A Moment by Kit and Ace
SLOWTOPIAS
As consumers’ lives speed
up and become more
superficial, they are seeking
deeper, more cultural
experiences. There is a need
to slow down, to retrench,
to reboot, and above all,
to relax in sumptuous and
romantic climes.
CONCIERGE CULTURE
What do you customers need and want?
A sudden spectacular focus on your service
ethic is required. Service should be about
solutions, not false promises; about going
beyond what is expected, being truly surprising
and touching customers with real emotions
and a heart-felt, human response.
Treehotel
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT THE FIFTH SCENARIO Our economic, political and
environmental systems are
collapsing. Biological and business
systems are mutating. New life
forms are emerging. ‘There are few
people who think the amount of
disruption we are going through
now is going to decrease over time
– most people think it’s going to
increase,’ says Salim Ismail, executive director of Singularity
University.
HOMEDULGENCE
Consumers across the globe are looking at innovative ways to maintain the good life they’ve come to treasure, without the expense of going out all the time. This is not quite the indulgent, cocooning trend of a few years ago, but a savvy way to style out the credit crunch with luxury delivery services, home-dining clubs, and straight-to-your-door banking at the core.
HOMESTEAD 3.0
Family sizes are changing, and our homes are
adapting to accommodate new social and
environmental behaviours. By 2020, blended
technology will become the norm. Communal
spaces – whether within the home or the
wider community – will be more common.
Owned by No One by Robin Alysha Clemens
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT TURBULENT TEENS Entire brand, product and service
philosophies will have to be
recalibrated to appeal to a
consumer for whom considered
consumption, sustainability status
and stuffocation aren’t just buzz
terms. Less is increasingly more.
Brands will have to show how
essential their offer is.
BEYOND RETAIL
Over the past 10 years, we have seen
the growth of online retail and the
pop-up store. The coming decade will
see them evolve into new immersive
spaces both on and offline, going far
beyond retail as we know it.
76%
of consumers in
the UK now cite
value for money
as the number one attribute in
their favourite
brands
The Future Laboratory’s
Brand Personality
Register
‘Augmented reality has
the opportunity to be a
boom for a retailers in so
many ways. You could
be passing the store and
there could be augmented
reality displays; in-store
the product could be
marked-up’
Dr Windsor Holden of
Juniper Research.
Club Palace by Leloi
RURBAN REVOLUTION
City dwellers are rejecting the impersonal
bigness of globalisation and reconnecting with
their communities. They are living hyperlocally,
growing their own food and embracing small-
scale microbrands. They are making their urban
lives feel as rural as possible. Flexible,
uncomplicated, human companies will be best
placed to navigate the Rurban Revolution.
Emotional Supply Chains by Korakrit Arunanondchai
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT ANARCOMY DECADE Something is stirring. In Egypt, a people’s revolt has overthrown a long-standing oppressor. In the UK, students smashed through government buildings in anger over rising tuition fees. This rebellious spirit is causing change, driving people to reject compromise and focus instead on bold transformation.
THE
TOMORROW
STORE
Bland, generic store experiences are
no longer enough to lure consumers
away from online shopping in this
challenging economic climate. The
Tomorrow Store will be mobile,
personal, experiential, informed,
inline, social and theatrical.
Exploring spaces of Tomorrow by Space 10
‘In the future, each customer’s experience
of retail will be unique, every time you visit
a store – whether that is online, offline,
inline or through-the-line – it will be created
specifically according to your needs,
your desires and your character’
Chris Sanderson, The Future Laboratory
87% of retailers say
that consumers
could find better
deals using their
smartphones
Booz & Company
NETSTALGIA
A new generation of creatives is rejecting
today’s polished, corporate internet and
remaking it with a 90s twist.
Anthony McCall You and I, Light Show at the Hayward
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT
RE-ENLIGHTENMENT
RISING
For years people looked down on it as dull, square and best kept behind closed doors, but science is now breaking out of the laboratory – onto theatre stages and fashion catwalks into galleries and shops, and into the minds of the brightest creatives. The last time science combined so powerfully with art, culture and commerce is known as the Enlightenment. For that reason, we call this new age the Re-enlightenment.
THE DAWN OF THE MEGA SYSTEMS
Apple, Amazon, Alibaba, Google,
Facebook and Weibo are no longer
simply trading platforms. They are
the mega-systems of tomorrow,
within which most of us will
socialise, shop and live our lives.
‘Leveraging the power
of lightweight
recommendations
between friends can be
one of the most powerful
tools you can have’
Tracy Yaverbaun, Facebook
New Spring by Cos X Studio Swine
Over the next five years, Amazon
is predicted to grow by 40% each
year, while Facebook is expected
to grow 29% a year in the same
period. Apple will grow by 19%
and Google by 14% a year
Yahoo! Finance
FUTURETAINMENT
As audiences flock to immersive, convivial
experiences, entertainers are blurring the
distinctions between spectator and performer,
digital and physical, hospitality and art, and
reality and fantasy.
Collection 4 by Phelan
THE CONVERGENCE ECONOMY
The borders between lifestyle
industries, between forms of art
and entertainment, and between
the senses are increasingly
blurred. Brands can be anything
and walls are for tearing down.
‘Oculus Rift is essentially a new tool in storytelling. With this, you’re immersed in the story rather than just passively involved in it’
Alex Lambert, a creative at Inition
BY 2030 the average home
in China will have
40–50 intelligent
devices or sensors
connected to the
internet, generating
200 terabytes
of data on an
annual basis
2013 report from International
Data Corporation
Kuri campaign by Mayfield Robotics
AWAKENING TECH
Our digital and offline worlds are converging.
We have become bedfellows with robots,
we take advice from gadgets, we ask mega-
systems for answers to life’s questions.
Makin moves by Kouhei Namaka
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT NEW BRICOLAGE LIVING Identity used to be something that
you were born with. Age, race,
gender and nationality were firmly
fixed and determined your place
in the world. Now, our identities are
sliding further towards something
we collect, assemble and arrange.
We are entering an era of Bricolage Living.
ANTI-AUTHENTICITY MARKETING
Tales of authenticity and
heritage are leaving a bad taste
in consumers’ mouths as brands
mercilessly misappropriate these
values and divest them of meaning.
78% of Americans
are not loyal to
a particular brand
across a variety
of sectors
Nielsen
‘People are in such control
of what they consume.
Interrupting people is no
longer the best way to get
their attention’
Matt Mattox, The Martin Agency
THE E-MOTIONAL ECONOMY
A new wave of sophisticated emodiversity
is ushering in an era in which people are
increasingly obsessed with how everything
makes them feel.
EXPERIENCE 2020
Customer experiences are becoming
meaningless. But as we head towards
the next decade, brands must ensure that
they only invest in experiences that offer value.
THE FOCUS FILTER
A race for attention is raging across media,
advertising and culture in our era of non-stop
digital distraction.
e-Palette concept by Toyota
SUBCONSCIOUS COMMERCE
Consumers now demand levels
of convenience so extreme that
it is fast becoming difficult to
distinguish between product
discovery, purchase moment and
private life. Businesses across all
sectors will have to decide whether
they want to embrace this
convenience-first culture or,
alternatively, invest in building
functional friction. Those who don’t
react risk falling from consumer
consciousness altogether.
‘When it comes to the most central tenet of individualism – free will – the tech companies have a different way. They hope to automate the choices, both large and small, that we make as we float through the day’
Franklin Foer, author, World Without Mind
The average US convenience
store shopper spends 42
seconds waiting in line to pay
and 21 seconds paying
NACS Speed Metrics
ALGORITHMIC BEAUTY
As beauty technologies gain in popularity, social media, artificial intelligence and algorithms are beginning to shape a new beauty ideal.
STOREFRONT SALVATION
Fuelled by an understanding that saving
the store relies on a combination of physical
touchpoints and digital technology, retailers
are reconsidering the purpose of bricks-and-
mortar shops.
IMMATERIAL FASHION
As the fashion industry grapples with
existential questions about supply chain and
overconsumption, digitisation offers a new
route for consumers still seeking to engage
with clothing brands.
DEEP by The Fabricant and Amber Jae Slooten
Photography by Matias Alonso Revelli
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT RESILIENCE CULTURE We live in an age of comfort zone
culture, nestling among the people,
platforms, places and behaviours
where we feel like one of the crowd.
But this bubble-wrapped existence
isn’t working. To help consumers
break out of their cocoons, counter-
movements are materialising,
powered by brands and institutions.
PROGRAMMABLE REALITIES
The rise of reactive new materials
and technologies means that future
physical consumer touchpoints will
no longer be set in stone… or any
other solid matter.
More than 13m AR apps
built with Apple’s ARKit
have been installed since
September 2017
SensorTower
FRKWYS Vol. 15- serenitatem by Visible Cloaks, Yoshio Ojima & Satsuki Shibano
‘People spend their money where
they spend their time, and more
and more people are spending
their time in digital eco-systems’
David Uy, BLMP Licensing Marketplace
COMMUNITY COMMERCE
A new wave of decentralised retail concepts
are transforming e-commerce as consumers
look for alternative ways to access and
exchange products and services online.
CONSCIOUS DECELERATION
Struggling to keep up with fast-paced and
demanding approaches to fitness, health-
conscious consumers are looking for a
more measured, long-term approach.
HOME EATERTAINMENT
Changing dining dynamics have
created a new convenience culture
focused on elevating the experience
and enjoyment of eating and drinking
at home. With the home playing a
renewed role in the way we eat and
entertain, direct-to-consumer
products and hospitality concepts
are encouraging heightened, intimate
experiences behind closed doors.
'The economic benefits
of sharing rather than
owning an under-utilised
kitchen are likely to
become more and more
apparent’
UBS
‘Traditional meal occasions
are declining. Years ago, people
used to schedule their lives
around their meals – now we
eat around our schedules’
Jennifer Bentz, Tyson Foods
ENLIGHTENED STATES
As consumers metamorphose,
their thirst for new experiences will
become more existential and
contemplative, with explorations of
self and identity taking priority over
shallow social media spectacles.
Learn how your business can
harness this new consumer shift.
HINDSIGHT
The impulse to seek new experiences is shifting
focus, away from their social currency and
towards their personal value.
INSIGHT
As the experience economy becomes
increasingly introspective, it will offer unique
opportunities to stimulate and support a range
of emotions and states of mind.
Amsterdam Museumnacht
FORESIGHT
The experiences of tomorrow will cultivate
a greater, more resilient sense of self, providing
intuitive ways to grapple with personal, political
and societal challenges.
THE GREAT DISRUPTION
Depleting resources, ‘wild’
technologies, an ageing population,
declining birth rates and a burning
planet are all leading us towards the
sixth extinction brought about by
mankind. But what if those wild
technologies – stemtech, biotech,
syntech, AI, robotics – are really the
solution, and nature itself, or rather
its inability to adapt, part of
the problem?
HINDSIGHT
In the past, we’ve viewed
humankind and nature as two
forces in opposition.
But viewed differently, or
seen as vital parts of the
same complex system (and
problem), then such opposition falls away, and
science, nature, technology
and the arts become
consilient pathways towards
the same end goal – re-
imagining or re-engineering
our collective tomorrows.
INSIGHT
This global rebooting isn’t about
turning the clocks back or denying
science. If we are to broker
tomorrow’s solutions for the long
gain, then we may have to rethink
everything, from accepted notions of
sustainability to how we feel about
nuclear fusion, mass industrial
pharming, our right to enjoy longer,
healthier lives.
FORESIGHT
Nature, science, man and AI will alter the ground rules of what it means to be human. In this disruption, our plasticated oceans may be seen as a welcome transition phase that is long overdue, those microbeads in our body the equally welcome and inevitable beginning of a new evolutionary cycle.
ACCESS MACROTRENDS
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Consumer
From 9/11 and the Great Recession to the
iPhone, Brexit and climate change, the past
two decades have burnt us out. Yet they
have also made us more resilient, mindful
and connected than ever before.

As we enter The Transformative Twenties,
explore how consumer macrotrends have
morphed into one another and what this
means for tomorrow’s consumption habits.

While scrolling through, click on any macrotrend to read the full report on our trends intelligence platform, LS:N Global.
Zalando Sneakers by Superimpose
The Museum of Copying by FAT
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT FEAR, UNCERTAINTY, DOUBT Marriage, the middle class,
middle management, middle age,
Christianity, teenagers, elderly men
and housewives are just a few of
the old economy groupings and
tribes in social free-fall. Childhood
is being eroded and many of us,
wary of the future, have begun
to revisit and reconstruct our
own pasts.
THE TOMORROW PEOPLE
Bio-aesthetics, bio-commerce, bio-technology,
bio-futures and bio-architecture… as geneticists
register genes that promise everything from
second skins to anti-baldness treatments,
tomorrow’s world won’t just be about designing
products but about designing people, food,
animals and the fabric of the universe.
THIRD MAN RISING
Male gender roles are in turmoil, but so too
are the contents of men’s magazines and the
lifestyle categories on which they were once
founded. New Men have been dethroned by
New Lads, then Soft Lads and these, in turn,
by a slew of lifestyle categories that have
attempted to pin men down at a time when
they are defying all attempts to label them.
BRIDGE CAREERS
Most workers are unlikely to achieve the
retirement stereotype of poolside relaxation
with an umbrella-garnished cocktail. But
giving up work in one’s late 50s or early 60s
remained the norm until recently. Returnments,
gerentrepreneurs, bridge careerists –
people are working longer and retiring later.
PERSON UNCLASSIFIED
The mass immigration of the past 50 years
has hybridised the demographic make-up of
contemporary society. Younger generations
are growing up in environments cross-
pollinated with different races, faiths and
nationalities, and previous demographic
patterns are likely to be outdated and irrelevant.
Campaign by Nike and FKA Twigs
SUNSHINE TEENS
Forget Generation X and turn
your attention instead to
Sunshine Teens. They are
positive, proactive, and above
all, personally and politically
motivated. This is a generation
who believe Boomers have failed
them, and want to sort things
out before it is too late.
EXURBANITES
Villages now contain
inhabitants with increasingly
urban outlooks – exurbanites.
Their political views are
liberal, they want their
broadband and their Illy
coffee, and they are not too
keen on hunting or the
Countryside Alliance.
DISCONNECTED YOUTH
After a generation of upbeat Sunshine Teens,
it’s back to business as usual, as we find that
teenagers have gone back to being lawless,
hedonistic, moody and disconnected from
society. They focus on self-sufficiency, self-
reliance, a sense of freedom and creativity.
THERAPY NATION
There can be no doubt that the
talking therapies are moving into the
mainstream. We can see increased
stress levels in modern living, as
well as dissatisfaction syndromes,
cultural blurring and the demise of
traditional authority role models,
the shift from organised religion
to secular spiritualism, and the rise
of wellness and life management.
BY 2020 unipolar depression
will account for the
second largest
burden of disease
globally
World Health Organisation
‘Our affluent lifestyles are
actually making us unhappier’
Professor Andrew Oswald of Warwick University
LADULTS
Ladults are part of a generation where there
is a growing emphasis on life-long learning
and experience-driven activities over careers.
Increased competition in the workplace and
the growing dominance of women in the public
and social area have caused the majority
of this group to re-assess their views about
self and their sense of masculinity.
THE G-TECH REVOLUTION
Global teenage girls are catching the technology industry unawares with their know-how and online lifestyles. Teenage girls are shaping the way the rest of us will consume technology in the future, but their consumption is largely ignored or undetected.
GENERATION JONES
Generation Jones constitutes people born
from 1955 to 1965. They share neither the
sense of tradition, community, idealism or the general trust of government of the Baby
Boomers. They yearn for local products,
sustainable communities, better schools
and brands, products and services that
are simple, straightforward, and above all,
tell things as they are.
NU MORALITIES
Now services, brands,
products and even pastimes
are increasingly being judged
by the consumer on moral
rather than political grounds.
Consumers are reaching their
own conclusions about good
and bad behaviour.
MENAISSANCE
The new breed of male
is aspirational, self-
determinant, manly but not
macho, and certainly not
feminine. Masculinity is
changing the way men want
to look and feel, which is
more mature, sober and
stylishly formal.
SLOWTOPIAS
As consumers’ lives speed up and become
more superficial, they are seeking deeper,
more cultural experiences. There is a palpable
need to slow down, to retrench, to reboot,
and above all, to relax in sumptuous and
romantic climes.
Pause For A Moment by Kit and Ace, Vancouver.
The Feminist Internet
THE FEMALE WEB
In Europe and the US, women outnumber men
in terms of their online activity. Globally,
more than half of all new web users are now
women, according to Jupiter Research.
The internet – in emotional terms and traffic
terms, at least – will be predominantly female.
THE NEW
SOBRIETY
Rather than the ‘little and often’
approach to consumption that has
dominated in recent years, ‘fewer
and better’ is to become the new
motto across fashion, food and home. We examine the new sober
approach to consumption.
78% of people say that
brands that offer
value for money are
likely to influence
their purchasing
decisions
The Future Laboratory’s Brand Personality Register
The Amazin Apartment by Future Facility
‘People are feeling the pinch, but
they want the things they buy to last.
They want more quality, and they are
prepared to go up in price. They are very
conscious of getting better value for money’
Katrin Magnussen, Mintel
Treehotel
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT THE FIFTH
SCENARIO
Our economic, political and
environmental systems are
collapsing. Biological and business
systems are mutating. New life
forms are emerging. ‘There are
few people who think the amount
of disruption we are going through
now is going to decrease over
time – most people think it’s going
to increase,’ says Salim Ismail,
executive director of Singularity
University.
HOMEDULGENCE
Consumers across the globe are
looking at innovative ways to maintain
the good life they’ve come to
treasure, without the expense of
going out all the time. This is not quite
the indulgent, cocooning trend of
a few years ago, but a savvy and
convivial way to style out the credit
crunch with luxury delivery services,
home-dining clubs and straight-to-
your-door banking at the core.
25%
of US bar
managers report
a decline in
the number of
drinks ordered
Nielsen/Bevinco
‘One of the most important
things for brands to
consider when they are
invited into a customer’s
home is not just the role
the product will serve,
but the manner in which
it will arrive there’
FREESUMERISM
As the cost of everything tends towards zero,
the growing trend for Freesumerism means the
notion of value is undergoing a major shift.
Smart brands are re-evaluating their business
models, reconsidering the value of the brand
and recalculating how they should charge for it.
BLEISURE
The line between leisure and
business is now blurred. The
services formerly created for
businesspeople must now be
adapted for a generation hell-bent
on leisure. At the same time,
pastimes usually considered leisure
-orientated – such as social
networking, high design and cultural
experiences – are now a central
part of forward-looking working
experiences.
‘We often thought of work as something you
do to get money to buy leisure. But that is a
false way to look at it now. If you are doing
something that you enjoy doing and you are
getting paid for it, it becomes a profitable
hobby rather than drudgery’
Daniel Pink, author of A Whole New Mind
66% of all respondents
to a Microsoft
survey say mobile
technologies allow
them to determine
their own schedules
NO FRILLS AFFLUENT
Beyond the recession, budgeting will become
a new household activity for consumers in their
20s and 30s. As they cope with the
continued fallout of living in debt, they have a
renewed determination to pay it off, as
credit remains off-limits to the majority of us.
HOMESTEAD
3.0
Family sizes are changing,
and our homes are adapting
to accommodate new social
and environmental
behaviours. By 2020, blended
technology will become the
norm. Communal spaces –
whether within the home
or the wider community –
will be more common.
The road to F-ABRIC, Frietag
BETAPRENEURS
A new entrepreneurial
mindset is taking hold that is
informed through knowledge
of the web, the digital world
and the power of launching
ideas in beta mode. These
new Betapreneurs are taking
their digital know-how into
non-IT, real-world industries.
Deathbed campaign by Chi & Partners
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT PROHIBITION
CULTURE
Everywhere you look, behaviour is
being curbed, controlled, nudged
and monitored. The ‘war on waste’
is creating a stealth tax that covers
everything from the food we eat
to how we should live, look and
engage with the brands we buy.
GENERATION D
They can’t imagine a world without
computers, smartphones and the
internet. This is the first native digital
generation who don’t care if a product
is physical or digital. If they can pay
for it, they probably will. But they
won’t wait for it. These channel-
hopping, instant-messaging, web-
browsing kids are the consumers
of the future.
‘Students today are
all ‘native speakers’
of the digital language
of computers, video
games and the internet’
Prensky
‘The environment is pretty
important to me, there’s a
community garden at the back
of our school that I help out
with. And I recycle, too’
Anthony, Generation D case study
Owned by No One by Robin Alysha Clemens
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT TURBULENT TEENS Entire brand, product and service
philosophies will have to be
recalibrated to appeal to a
consumer for whom consumption,
sustainability status and
stuffocation aren’t just buzz terms.
Less is increasingly more. Brands
will have to show how essential
their offer is.
RURBAN REVOLUTION
City dwellers are rejecting the impersonal
bigness of globalisation and reconnecting with
their communities. They are living hyperlocally,
growing their own food and embracing small-
scale microbrands. They are making their urban
lives feel as rural as possible. Flexible,
uncomplicated, human companies will be best
placed to navigate the Rurban Revolution.
REVIVALISM
Seeking shelter from the unsettling
storm clouds of recession and
environment anxiety, consumers
are reviving and revamping
forgotten customs, skills and
technologies. Revivalism offers
hope by connecting consumers
with a stable past and by giving
brands clear clues about what to
do. But it can also be a rallying
point for the forces of extreme
nationalism, resurgent amid global
economic uncertainty.
Hair Highway by Studio Swine
‘People are fed up with the
economic and social model of
mass production and consumption’
Jeffrey Saunders, Copenhagen Institute for Future Studies.
‘My friends are all running marathons in
their spare time or competing to bench
press the most weight at the gym,’ he says.
‘Essentially, taking part in activities that
are mere extensions of the goal-driven
workplace. And they are now waking up
to this disturbing fact’
Hudson Institute’s Herb London
Emotional Supply Chains by Korakrit Arunanondchai
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT ANARCONOMY DECADE Something is stirring. In Egypt, a people’s revolt has overthrown a long-standing oppressor. In the UK, students smashed through government buildings in anger over rising tuition fees. This rebellious spirit is causing change, driving people to reject compromise and focus instead on bold transformation.
PERSONAL INFORMATION ECONOMY
Online, there are few places we can hide.
From Facebook to Google+, Tesco, Wal-Mart,
American Express, Foursquare and Bing,
brands are recording our personal information
and using it to anticipate our thoughts,
words and product purchases – and
to increase their value.
JUST NOTS
They pay their taxes, work hard and do all the
right things. But millions are just not making
ends meet, just not making it onto the property
ladder and just not living the lives to which they
aspire. Addressing this burgeoning group now
will not only reap short-term rewards, but long-
term benefits too as they improve their levels of education and have more money to spend.
THE NEW SUBLIMITY
Consumers are feeling disaffected
and disconnected by the crisis of
capitalism, by banking systems and
by digital ubiquity. They are now
seeking greater meaning from their
lives. Successful brands will offer
solutions for this new mindset,
from new ways to regulate digital
intrusiveness to holistic spiritual
spaces and services that genuinely
promote wellbeing and happiness.
‘They want a real
and authentic life...
the crisis of
consumerism is the
crisis of meaning’
Alan Moore, author, No Straight Lines
50% of a knowledge
worker’s day is
spent managing
information, which
results in ‘a loss of
ability to make
decisions, process
information and
prioritise tasks’
New York research brand Basex
FUTURE FAMILY
In these turbulent times, the idea of family is
becoming more important, as the nuclear family
unit gives way to multi-generational clans and
single-person households that want smaller,
more flexible and more sustainable homes.
NETSTALGIA
A new generation of creatives is rejecting
today’s polished, corporate internet and
remaking it with a 90s twist.
Anthony McCall You and I
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT
RE-ENLIGHTENMENT
RISING
For years people looked down on it as dull, square and best kept behind closed doors, but science is now breaking out of the laboratory – onto theatre stages and fashion catwalks, into galleries and shops, and into the minds of the brightest creatives.
GENERATION I
You type, they swipe. You click,
they tap. You customise the
template, they code their own.
Born after 2002, today’s screen-
agers demand experiences that are
richer, more immediate, interactive
and, above all, more intuitive than
ever before. Brands will have to
make all experiences simpler, more
direct, but deeper and richer. This
intuitiveness will be defining for
this new generation.
Generation I kids
influence £870bn
($1.12 trillion, €1 trillion)
of family spending a year
Child marketing expert James McNeal
Adyen
‘Machines will be made more
intuitive, they’ll be able to read
the subtle expressions on your
face to decide what to show
you and what not to show you.
And today’s children will become
used to this very quickly, and
expect technology to serve
their emotional needs.’
Elina Kanan, Affectiva
FLAT AGE SOCIETY
Something exciting is in the air. Forget
everything you thought about being old, or age,
even. In the society of the future, age isn’t just
a number – it’s flat. Flat-Agers aren’t defined
by their age, they’re moved by their interests,
passions and ambitions, just like everyone else.
THE SHARDED SELF
Social media is changing how we
interact, make decisions and form
opinions. As we pin, post and preen
our way to an ideal identity online,
these personality fragments are
forming the new components of
a Sharded Self – in which we
inhabit as many lives as we like.
‘We now create several versions of
the self, all with different personalities
and personas, not just between the
online and offline worlds, but different
versions of the online self’
Jamie Bartlett, Demos Centre for the Analysis of Social Media
46% Is the increase
in 2013 in number
of UK businesses
hiring freelancers
online
Elance
The Sound of Cos by Lerner & Sander
THE NEW VALUE ECONOMY
Ownership is receding as an ideal and a way
to mark value. We share, rent and borrow
products now, creating new systems of value
and worth in the process. This is happening
across sectors and categories. But it is also
happening in terms of trust, reputation,
integrity, even in terms of how we value and
market our privacy and personal data.
Makin moves by Kouhei Namaka
SOCIETY SNAPSHOT NEW BRICOLAGE LIVING Identity used to be something that
you were born with. Age, race,
gender and nationality were firmly
fixed and determined your place
in the world. Now, our identities are
sliding further towards something
we collect, assemble and arrange.
We are entering an era of Bricolage Living.
NEUTRAL CULTURE
Historically, race and gender have
been the most divisive markers
of identity. While they are a
foundation of mainstream culture,
early adopters and innovators are
beginning challenge these rigid
classifications and replace them
with visions of identity that are
more personal and nuanced.
'Brands are learning that
diversity and inclusion
is normal, and just plain
good for business'
Andrew Barratt, Ogilvy Pride
‘Advertising helps to normalise
representations and lead people
down the path of acceptance,
or at least acquiescence’
Jason Chambers, University of Illinois
THE OPTIMISED SELF
Humanity is on a quest. It is not a quest for
perfection, but for optimisation – to be the
optimal versions of ourselves, the most
effective and the most efficient that we can
be. There is no end of the journey, no perfect
self – but there is continual improvement.
GEN VIZ
Teenagers are no longer self-absorbed souls
struggling through puberty. Abstinence and
realness are the order of the day for these
new social activists. Say hello to Gen Viz,
the ultimate early adopters, powering the
visual-first culture of tomorrow.
THE LEARNING ECONOMY
Education has changed from an
early-life to a life-long activity,
but traditional institutions have
failed to keep up with consumers.
Brands are now stepping in as
partners in this continuing
process of self-improvement.
‘Rather than trying to
change the world to
support girls, it’s more
efficient to support
girls so they can
change the world’
Molly Logan
‘You’re going to see learning shift to these mini bite-sized chunks of information that you can get on the go and when you need it and at any given time’
Antonia Cusumano, PwC
CONSUMER 2020
In the next decade, brands need to prepare
for consumers who are abandoning traditional
institutions, seeking comfort in safe spaces
and reasserting their sense of national pride.
THE FOCUS FILTER
Economic scarcity over the past 200
years has shifted from land to labour
to knowledge, and now thanks to the
internet, attention. But in the years
ahead, focus will replace attention
as the goal for all communications.
Attention is fleeting while focus is
prolonged, a distinction that today’s
brands seem to be missing.
‘Most people
have lost the
ability to go
deep, spending
their days in
a frantic blur
of email and
social media’
Cal Newport,
computer scientist
‘Shared work
environments are
associated with increases
in distraction, negative
relationships and distrust’
Rachel Morrison, senior lecturer
Time Is Precious campaign by Nike
NEO KINSHIP
As the nuclear family disappears and more fluid
and complex forms of kinship take its place,
technology is not only helping to run the
household, but is becoming part of it.
THE AMERICAN MIDDLE
The American middle class, once the
aspirational ideal, is becoming a myth.
Brands must learn to speak to this
demographic that have felt left behind
by the rise of coastal elitism.
MORALITY RECODED
We are now faced with unforeseen
moral dilemmas that challenge the
very core of what it means to be
human. Our traditional moral
frameworks of religion and family are
declining. Institutions, brands and
consumers are now re-evaluating the
power of innovation and the need for
a moral code fit for a digital era.
Film by Veli Creative
72% of people in the US said
they are uneasy at the
thought of machines
performing human duties
Pew Research Center
‘Deep empathy and
self-reflection are
critical for us to build
a healthier future’
Suresh Venkatasubramanian, University of Utah
UNEASY AFFLUENCE
A collective backlash against
ostentatious spending is
fuelling new anxiety among
luxury consumers. This is
forcing luxury brands to
rethink their products and
services to be more social,
accessible and supportive.
CERTIFIED WELLNESS
The once distinctly separate
worlds of health and wellness
are converging as consumers
seek a new framework for
healthy living that prioritises
convenience, accessibility
and fidelity.
ANXIETY REBELLION
Instead of numbing their anxiety with
substances or indulging in other vices,
Generation Z are turning emotions into
actions, challenging existing societal
structures like finance and business.
For The Coming Age, Collusion by ASOS
UPROOTED DIETS
Diets are undergoing a seismic shift as
threatened supply chains, shortened food
miles and a demand for more positive action
from brands change what we eat and where
it comes from.
RESILIENCE CULTURE
We live in an age of self-censorship,
hyper-safe spaces and comfort zone
culture, nestling among the people,
platforms, places and behaviours
where we feel like one of the crowd.
But this bubble-wrapped existence
isn’t working. To help consumers
break out of their cocoons,
counter-movements are materialising
around the world powered by
brands and institutions.
39%
of US adults felt
more anxious in
2018 than the
previous year.
American Psychiatric Association
'We are teaching
a generation the habits
of anxious, depressed
and polarised people,
and then we’re surprised
that they are anxious,
depressed and
polarised'
Greg Lukianoff, co-author of
The Coddling of the American Mind
UNCOUPLED LIVING
Being in a couple is becoming a less prevalent
way to structure society. With more people
living and eating alone, and buying items for
one, it is time to consider how this grand
uncoupling will affect consumption. From
downsizing packaging to removing the stigma
of single parenthood, opportunities abound for
those that celebrate a positively single mindset.
CONSCIOUS DECELERATION
Struggling to keep up with fast-paced and
demanding approaches to fitness, health-
conscious consumers are looking for a more
measured, long-term approach.
Gentle Monster kids by Luca Mastroianni
LIBERATION LUXURY
As global wealth fluctuates, a new mindset
is emerging centred on curiosity, flexibility
and footloose living. In order to meet these
shifting priorities, luxury brands must
themselves break free from the traditional
ties of affluent lifestyles.
BIO-POSITIVE BEAUTY
Consumers are demanding short, traceable supply chains and condensed routines are in high demand as beauty moves from zero to positive impact.
PARADOX PERSONAS
Unlike Millennials, Generation Z are swapping self-promotion for self-awareness, using the digital world to enrich but not define their offline selves.
PLEASURE REVOLUTION
As The New Sublimity evolves, our
desire for fulfilment is treading new
paths. The high-calibre lifestyles
we predicted in The Optimised Self
have arrived, but with consumers
facing a barrage of expectations, it
is rapidly dawning on them that the
self-actualising activities they have
bought into – from wellness to the
ritual of workism – are hindering
their ability to feel fulfilled.
HINDSIGHT
Caught in a whirlwind of perfectionism, side hustles and an endless quest for optimisation, consumers are pressing pause and reconsidering their part in the capitalist system.
INSIGHT
No longer simply chasing achievement,
consumers will embrace moments of
downtime, pleasure and serendipity
to gain a new perspective on life.
FORESIGHT
As tomorrow’s consumers find their
equilibrium, societies and brands will
be reshaped to fit the desires that come
with a slower, introspective and more
joyful lifestyle.
THE BIG REMOTE
Remote-access working is already
a reality for innovators and early
adopters in our population. Now,
the ongoing climate crisis and
Covid-19 have accelerated its push
into the mass-market mainstream,
giving us one of the largest case
studies in history from which to
draw inspiration and learn.
HINDSIGHT
Unlike the rigid work
hierarchies of previous
generations, the internet,
social media, Millennials,
and post-2008 recession
entrepreneurialism have
all contributed to the three
Cs mindset (collaboration,
creativity, conversation)
that has facilitated this
push to mass-market
remote working.
INSIGHT
Home working, co-working, digital
nomading and tetherless living are all
part of the Big Remote phenomenon.
But as we learn to run teams
remotely, we are also learning about
the role of isolation management,
remote team wellbeing and mass-
online employee participation (MOEP)
when it comes to tackling problems
and determining solutions.
FORESIGHT
This mass-market remote working (MMRW)
shift will lead to new household configurations
as people covet 5G work suites and hyperlocal
co-working communities. Physical presenteeism will no longer be valid as a key measure of productivity.

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