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24 : 07 : 20 : Weekly Debrief

Need to Know

This week: Resilient city garments, genderless sexcare, Universal Everything's phygital humans, post-work exercise snacks and an eco-first Indian school.

Nike ISPA, global

1. Nike ISPA is designed for everyday extremes

Global – Nike’s latest apparel range, ISPA, is designed to withstand the extremes of everyday life.

With products including an inflatable jacket, a mesh bodysuit and split-toe sneakers, each item is designed in a way that repurposes the needs of ultra sport activities to suit the lifestyles of active city dwellers. For example, the jacket's lining incorporates a custom-built air bladder that inflates the coat when the temperature drops. Mesh airflow panels on the bodysuit follow Nike's research into heat and sweat accumulation during movement.

‘ISPA is making more about the kind of extremes and the fringes of what people are doing more in their everyday lives in the city,’ explains Nur Abbas, design director for energy apparel at Nike. ‘So it's not necessarily about running faster or jumping higher, but how can you improve the way someone feels throughout the day.'

No longer reserved for people living extreme lifestyles, products aimed at building Resilience Culture are gaining traction and appealing to the everyday consumer.

Cake, LA

2. Cake delivers sexual pleasure without labels

Los Angeles – Cake's line of lubricants are inspired by skincare and take a fluid view of gender and sexuality.

Positioned as a wellness brand for the bedroom, its product line focuses on anatomy and sexual preferences, rather than traditional gender labels, as a way to respond to people’s sense of pleasure and curiosity. Cake's playful tone of voice and design cues refer to pleasure in a no-nonsense way; products include a kit called ‘Let’s do it all’, which encourages exploration for couples, individuals and group experiences.

Hunter Morris, chief executive and co-founder of Cake, explains: ‘Regardless of gender or sexuality, we want to offer specialised products that enhance your sexual experiences – especially those open to trying something new in the bedroom, but not exactly sure where to start.’

With conversations around pleasure becoming increasingly inclusive, sexual wellness brands should remain aware of the importance of creating genderless products.

Super You by Universal Everything, UK

3.Super You experiments with the human form

UK – Universal Everything has launched an app that allows users to transform others into augmented reality (AR) characters.

Super You uses ARKit 3’s body-tracking technology to transform bodies in real time. Described as a ‘costume arts experiment’, the app features 11 costumes for users to try on virtually. Sampling a colour from the clothes an individual is wearing, it then tracks the person the camera is being pointed at to ‘place’ a costume on them.

‘This project combines our fascination for mixing timeless figurative representation with emerging technologies to create new forms of soulful digital expressions,’ Matt Pyke, founder of Universal Everything, explains. ‘By democratising the artwork through releasing this app to the public, we look forward to seeing the crazy, funny, inventive, unexpected results.’

As we explore in Programmable Realities, consumer touchpoints are becoming more as virtual and physical worlds collide.

4. An energy bar for Covid-wary commuters

London – Sports marketing agency Dark Horses has launched Home Run, a plant-based energy bar targeting physically active yet Covid-conscious commuters.

Designed for those who want to avoid public transport during the pandemic by running or cycling their commutes instead, the energy bar is positioned as a nutritious snack to fuel their journeys.

At part of the launch, Dark Horses has created a buddy scheme for first-time runners or cyclists called Home Run Commuter Routers, helping to ease people into their new routines.

We understand that people may be apprehensive about taking public transport again, but also worried about running or cycling in the city for the first time,' says Steve Howell, creative partner at Dark Horses. 'Our Home Run Commuter Routers will take all of that stress away.'

In our Food & Drink Tribes collection, we explore the Fastronomic Foodies who are using food as fuel to navigate their daily lives. Discover what drives them and three other food and drink Tribes by downloading the report here.

Home Run by Dark Horse, London
Forest by Nudes, Pune

5. A forest school focused on the environment

Mumbai – Architecture firm Nudes' nature-inspired construction aims to provide a healthy school environment for children from nursery age to 18 years.

Given the name Forest, it is the winning entry in a design competition for a new educational facility in Pune, India. The school will provide hands-on learning for children that highlights the interdependency of health and wellness and the surrounding environment.

It features two cylindrical towers wrapped in greenery school, an infinity-shaped cycling track on the roof, and a swimming pool and tennis courts in the basement. Set to be built in 2021, the design is a response to the environmental problems associated with urbanisation in India. 'The green live skin serves to purify the air from pollutants and related challenges affecting the health of the inhabitants of a city,’ says Nuru Karim, founder and principal of Nudes.

In response to a growing understanding of nature’s therapeutic effects, architects and designers are rewilding urban spaces. For more, read our Enlightened States macrotrend.

 

To future-proof your world, visit The Future Laboratory's forecasting platform LS:N Global for daily news, opinions, trends, sector specific insights, and strategic toolkits.

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